Credit

Raise Your Credit Score In 10 Easy Steps! (Create Your Money Series)

How to Raise Your Credit Score In 10 Easy Steps is the most informative book you will ever read about credit scores! An Accredited Financial Counselor with an MBA, Angel Love, has helped thousands of people all over the country learn real strategies to raise their credit scores. This information is available to anyone who wants to understand all aspects of the credit score, from the differences between the various scoring models, to how they’re calculated. Save hundreds, if not thousands of dollars on the cost of credit by implementing these practical solutions to managing your personal finances today! Learn why you have a different credit score from each of the credit reporting agencies! Find out the one thing that prevents a high score (780) from being an 800! Discover what consistently drops your score by 12-20 points each time you do it! Figure out how to re-build credit after a bankruptcy, or establish credit if you’ve never had it before! Discover little-known information on accessing your report from the 4th credit bureau, as well as the other agency that collects widely reported information about you! Learn where to get the money to pay off your credit card bills! This book offers complete and concise information on raising your score, and avoiding the things that decrease your score. Learn to think like the credit scoring models and qualify for the most competitive interest rates on houses, cars, and insurance policies. Get this book today and be part of that elite club with 800+ credit scores, enjoying greater financial freedom!

Hidden Credit Repair Secrets: Step-by-Step 6 Letter Dispute Plan Included

Step-by-step dispute plan included: Credit repair strategies they don’t want you to know. How To Increase Your Credit Score and Repair Your Credit With The Number 1 Book In The Country. 155 Positive Reviews Can’t be Wrong. “The most complete credit repair book I ever read. This book will teach you how to increase your credit score. – Sam Park”. What if you had the knowledge in the palm of your hand that could help you improve your credit report and as a result, you may qualify for the following: Your dream house, Your dream car, That new apartment, Your dream job, Start a new business, Increase your credit score and get into that new home or car. If you had this knowledge, would you use it to start living the life you want? What if you knew a handful of strategies that will allow you to do the following: Avoid embarrassing moments when applying for credit. Sleep at night because of no more abusive collection calls. Spend what you want at the mall and your favorite restaurants because you saved due to settlements. Avoid frustration and family fights due to money. Open your mail freely because you know it’s not a bill collector or a lawsuit. Take control of your credit in the comfort of your home. If you knew these strategies, would you take action to get inaccurate, misleading and questionable items off of your credit report? What if I showed you the same techniques and strategies credit repair companies and consultants use to challenge inaccurate and questionable items for their clients.? Would you take action? What if this book could give you the following: An easy step-by-step 6 letter campaign that will allow you to challenge any inaccurate, unverifiable and questionable information on your credit report? Over 15 sample letters ready to go. Easy to read and easy to follow chapters detailing credit repair information. Easy to understand, actionable steps that could save you money. Up-to-date and relevant information that match the economic conditions. What if you had more tools that would allow you to change your credit situation, would you act? What if you had these tools: Step-by-step game plan for rebuilding your credit. A comprehensive understanding of how to remove inaccurate, unverifiable and questionable judgments, collections and charge-offs. Easy to follow strategies on how to stop debt collectors in their tracks. Step-by-step instructions on how to raise your credit score. Step-by-step process to settling your debts even when the collector does not want to settle. Easy to read material that could read in one day. Clear instructions on what to do if the credit bureaus refuse to remove inaccurate, unverifiable and questionable information. Techniques on how to increase your credit score. If you had all of the tools listed above, would you take action? If the answer is yes, start repairing your credit today by clicking the add to cart button.

Secured Loans – The Pitfalls

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Taking out a loan for a small amount to pay for a purchase that is just outside your usual spending power should be quite a manageable situation. If you take the loan out at a reasonable rate of interest over a decent term then you should be able to make the repayments even if you find yourself out of work for a period. However it is a different story if you take out a mortgage to pay for a house, or a car loan. These forms of credit are often “secured” on your purchase, which means that, should you default on the loan, the lender will be able to reclaim the property from you as a way of making their money back.

Secured credit has such pitfalls because, without the possibility of reclaiming their money in this way, banks would need to charge higher rates of interest and keep the term of the loan much shorter than they currently are. This would put the purchase of a house or a new car far outside the range of most people. It is, however, vitally important to be sure that you have a contingency plan should you suddenly lose your job. In such cases, becoming unemployed can also mean becoming homeless.

Further to this, a default on a mortgage can stay on your credit file for some time, meaning that another mortgage any time soon will be an impossibility for you. Take into account all the perils of taking a mortgage before you sign any documents, because the drawbacks to secured credit could be prohibitive.

Is a Loan the Way To Go?

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In the society in which we live, we all see from day to day people who have possessions which we would like to own for ourselves. Unfortunately, budgetary concerns make this impossible, in some cases. To overcome this situation, more and more people are looking at taking out personal loans as a way of raising the money to fund their purchases. Of course, there are other reasons for taking out loans. Some people take them for business purposes – in order to raise the capital for an acquisition. Others, indeed, will take out loans to consolidate their debts into one big debt with more favorable repayment terms.

Whatever the reason for taking out a loan, it is important to bear in mind that repayments will stay at the same level for the duration of the account. It is important, then, to be completely sure that the amount you pay to a loan will be covered for the life of the loan. Many loans have attached insurance policies (the cost of which is attached to the balance) and if you are unable to work through ill health these can cover the monthly payment. However, you should read the small print on the terms of the insurance policy, because many insurance companies will try everything they can to avoid paying out.

If you are unsure that you will be able to keep up payments, it is essential that you look for other ways to raise the capital you need. As well as seriously infringing upon your daily solvency, poor credit history will affect your ability to get credit in the future.

Is Life Fantastic With Plastic?

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We in society have become used to using plastic cards to pay for our purchases, because it promises convenience, speed and reassurance about our situation. While today we may not have the money to pay for that stereo or that holiday, a quick call to a bank can be all it takes to allow you to make the purchase one day and worry about paying it off in the future. When used correctly, credit cards can be beneficial for the user, as they allow a situation where you can control the cost of living. They are, it should be said, best used as a kind of progressive weapon against delays. The problem comes when one is used as a shield against debt. The thing they simply fail to offer is thinking time.

With a credit card, you can make a purchase and not have to worry about the money not being there. It is there, it just isn’t yours. As long as you can replenish that money within a suitable time period, no-one will get angry. However, there is no way of the vendor knowing that you will be in a bad position to actually pay for the purchase, and indeed they have no reason to care. It is the bank who will have something to say about it when you fail to make payments that they were expecting you to make. And the thing about that is that banks have a way of making their displeasure very clear indeed.

Where The Banks Have Gone Wrong

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It would be very simplistic to place the blame for the global financial crisis at the door of one financial sector, or at the feet of any organisation operating within that sector. The reason why the finances of so many major countries are now unstable cannot be pinned down to one thing, but part of it is certainly attributable to unwise lending by banks and other financial institutions. While it could not securely be argued that this was what caused the financial crashes we have seen, there is no doubt that it hasn’t helped.

Quite apart from anything else, there is a sense that risky lending looked like a good idea for the banks and risky borrowing looked like a great idea for the customers up until very recently. For the banks, the idea was that the risks would bear greater rewards as money made more money and for the customers it seemed to be a case of all their Christmases coming at once. As it turned out, there were big warning signs that everyone ignored – leading to the banks having tons of bad debt on their books and the customers being hamstrung in a place where they suddenly had greatly reduced means and a raft of payments to meet.

There are other reasons for this crash, of course, and no-one would try to deny this. But the upshot for most of us is that banks will not be so free with their money, so borrowing from now on has to be extra diligent.

Irresponsible Lending, Spending and Borrowing

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One of the major criticisms of banks which emerged as the extent of the global credit crisis became clear to everyone was that they lent money irresponsibly to too many people. Most of us, if offered the chance to have a spending pot of more money than we earn in a month, would be sorely tempted. And maybe that is the problem. There are those who argue that credit should only be given to those who can show they don’t need it. While this is a tad harsh (short term borrowing can be a responsible solution in some cases), it might at least be argued that credit should only ever be given to those who have never abused it in the past.

Part of the problem is that banks saw fit to speculate on the continuing boom in the global economy and felt that by lending to people who were looking to become upwardly socially mobile they could cash in on those people being successful. However, for some potential borrowers it became clear that banks were taking risks and lending to people who had little hope of comfortably repaying the debt. Knowing that some contingency has to exist for these eventualities, people took advantage of this profligacy to take out big loans and enjoy a short-lived period of financial windfall – knowing that even when the money ran out they would simply be back to living the life they led before. Banks seem to be learning the lesson – but look at what it took for that to happen.

Can You Get Credit?

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One thing that has been made very clear to people over the last few years is that taking out credit comes with some risks attached. If you are borrowing either on a credit card or a loan, it really is not advisable to borrow “as much as you can”, when the amount that you can borrow tends to be dictated by the bank or institution from which you borrow it. There is some link between your monthly income and your credit rating, and the amount that the banks will lend to you. However it does not seem to apply in the same way with all banks.

Most people who have worked in credit control will tell you of an account they saw which showed a customer defaulting on a credit card where their credit limit was pretty huge and their monthly salary was comparatively small. Due to the limitations of the process used to judge some bank’s credit limit provisions sometimes there will be excessive money lent to people who give in to the temptation to spend it even knowing that they cannot afford to pay it back.

Alternatively if you have not shown a good history of paying back credit when you get it, you run the risk of either not getting credit or getting it in woefully short amounts. Depending on your reasons for needing the credit in the first place this may not matter so much – indeed it may be good news – but it is still something to be aware of.

How Times And Views Have Changed

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There was a time when to talk of having debts was like openly admitting that you liked to pull the wings off flies. People simply would not confess to having debt, even if it turned out that they did have debts, and quite substantial ones at that. Now, it really doesn’t seem that way. Debt is seen as an accepted hazard and a fact of life by many people – and there have been some good outcomes to that, with many responsible people on lower incomes able to spread the cost of necessary outlays. The problem comes when the debt cannot be managed.

It might be more beneficial for everyone if we started to differentiate more between kinds of debt. Rather than assuming that all debt was bad, if we could all tell the difference between unmanageable and manageable debt, necessary and unnecessary debt, then we would be able to judge when debt was an acceptable step, when it was the best option, and put together some ideas on how to stop people getting into damaging, excessive debts of the kind which can blight a life.

It would not be true to say that the present-day prevailing view on debt was the right one. Nor would it be right to say that the old-fashioned attitude was strictly fair or correct. What we can hopefully all agree on is that debt awareness is more important than anything, and that we should all learn to apply the common sense that none of us are shy of handing out to everyone else.

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